Syracuse New Times: The Running Man

“It’s going to be harder this time,” Hawkins maintains. “He has a lot more name recognition. He’s basically developing PILOTs {payment in lieu of taxes} for the developers. Look at his last financial filing: Bob Congel, Bruce Kenan, Bob Doucette. That seems to be what he sees as his role, as well as basically siding with Mayor Miner on just about every issue. But I can beat him by hustling. I’ll work harder. I’ll talk to more people. I’ll be on the street.”

 

Syracuse New Times, 07-10-2013

The Running Man

By Walt Shepperd

Ballot decisions loom for Greens and their go-to candidate Howie Hawkins.

Perennial Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins is out passing nominating petitions, but with a difference from the two decades past. This time, his name is on two or them. “We had a convention,” he explains, “and I did ask for designation for the 4th Council District. We’ve been back and forth between that seat and running for mayor.” Part of the Green indecision stems from the muddled mayoral picture. “The Republicans don’t have a candidate,” Hawkins says, “probably won’t. And the Democratic challengers to Miner—their whole program is that they can get the money from Cuomo, and she can’t because she’s fighting with him. 

That’s a funny fight. She was calling him out because he won’t go after the public employee unions like she is, saying she’s sticking her neck out, asking him where are you? And he had promised that, but he’s playing a lot slicker.” If a mayoral candidate, Hawkins’ major issue will be getting revenue sharing restored to its former levels.

“Miner lays out the problem,” he notes, “News flash: That happened in the “as we’ve lost the taxpaying manufac- ’50s and ’60s. Second news flash: In 1971, we got revenue sharing. What has happened since then, largely under Democratic administrations starting with Hugh Carey, is they have cut back on the revenue sharing. Used to be, we were supposed to get 8 percent of state revenues.We’re down to less than 1 percent. If they paid the revenue sharing we’re owed, there would not be a fiscal problem.”

“The argument on the other side,” he observes, “is that I have a better chance of winning the 4th District, and the Greens need a win. We’re always on the outside being a gadfly. If we win that first race, in all the other races we run we won’t be a commentary but a real option.” 

Two years ago, with no Republican in the race, Hawkins tallied 48 percent of the vote, losing to Democrat Khalid Bey, who is seeking a second term.

“It’s going to be harder this time,” Hawkins maintains. “He has a lot more name recognition. He’s basically developing PILOTs {payment in lieu of taxes} for the developers. Look at his last financial filing: Bob Congel, Bruce Kenan, Bob Doucette. That seems to be what he sees as his role, as well as basically siding with Mayor Miner on just about every issue. But I can beat him by hustling. I’ll work harder. I’ll talk to more people. I’ll be on the street.”

Turnout will also be a determinant.

Two years ago, of the 11,865 active registered voters in the 4th District, only 2,332 cast a ballot for Hawkins or Bey.

To decide what ballot slot Hawkins will fill, and to decide whether Barb Humphrey will run for school board or councilor-at-large, the Greens will hold another convention Sunday, July 14.

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Howie Hawkins is the 2017 Green candidate for Syracuse Mayor
Hawkins for Mayor